first:  last: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

 What's New (past 90 days)


HomeHome    SearchSearch    PrintPrint    Login - User: anonymousLogin    Add BookmarkAdd Bookmark

Tree:  

NOTE: In June 2010, I began a rebuild of this entire site after being hacked. You might find a few disruptions, missing links, or missing media. Please do let me know if you find an error...it may be something I am unaware of and would otherwise miss. Meanwhile, I have begun re-adding databases, media, cemeteries, various images and connecting them to their corresponding individuals and families. Much of this research is also available on Ancestry.com. If you would like an invitation to those trees, please let me know.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • War of the Rebellion: a North and South Family - Part of my personal research has included a search for the civil war records of my paternal 2nd great grandfather, John Worden. I finally found his pension file and other war records, after two decades of looking for the right soldier. Turns out that there is an interesting story to this; one that confirms something my mother alway said. When I was growing up, it was her unfounded contention that her side of the family had fought with my father's side in the war. She had no specific reason to think this, other than knowing there were soldiers on both sides. It was just a gut feeling. What would the odds be that they'd really ever have had close contact? Surely a long  shot! I am now able to place both men on opposite sides of the same fence, so to speak, at a POW camp. My maternal 3rd great grandfather was David Milton Tannehill. He was captured at Snyder's bluff, along with his son, William. They were both send to POW camps. William died at Fort Delaware, and his father was sent on to Point Lookout camp in Maryland, where he died in March of 1864. In John Worden's pension file is a sworn affidavit, detailing his service record. It turns out that he was sent to Point Lookout as a guard from fall of 1863 until the fall of 1864! He was there during the same time as David Tannehill...
  • David Milton Tannehill - He was born in Bibb County, Alabama, to Colonel Ninian Tannehill and Mary ?Polly? Prude. He was the second of four known children. His siblings were Mary Lavinia, the oldest, and younger brothers, John and Marion. He was raised on the banks of Roupe?s Creek, in the shadow of the great ironworks that bears the name Tannehill to this day. Its remains were found nestled at the southernmost reaches of the Appalachian Mountains. Today, it is restored and has become the Tannehill State Park and museum. I had the honor of visiting that place, and I waded in the same waters that my ancestors surely must have on many hot summer days...
  • Worden Mystery Solved! - For years, I have been attempting to solve the mystery of the centenarian. My grandfather, John Emery Worden, always claimed that a great grandfather of his was a centenarian, and that the family was from Wilkes-Barre. I quickly identified who the centenarian was (John Worden 1741-1842), but was unable to make the connection between my last known confirmed generation (John Worden the civil war soldier) and this man. The big breakthrough was finding that James Worden (Wordin) was the father of my civil war soldier ancestor, great great grandfather John Worden (1846-1923)...
  • Worden Resemblances - Studying the resemblance between two Worden lines. Both men are descendants of John Worden b. 27 Mar 1741, Fairfield, Connecticut; d. 6 Jan 1842, Wallkill, Orange, New York. John m. Hannah Stark 2 Oct 1772, Pawling, Dutchess, New York. Hannah b. 1739, Beekman, Dutchess, New York; d. 1810, Beekman, Dutchess, New York...
  • Will the real John please stand? - I am trying to sort out whether these are all the same John, or not. The contestants are John Savage and John Worden. In the photos, above, it seems that the man on the right has ears that protrude much farther than the man on the left. My best guess is that the man on the right is John Worden, while the man on the left is John Savage. Are the two men, above, the same man? Their uniform hats appear identical. John Savage was a harbor pilot for the Hudson River Day Lines (and this uniform is a match). Worden, however, was a stone cutter during that time...
  • The Heritiage Files bookstore is also available online.



LAST 30 DAYS OF UPDATES AND ADDITIONS